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State Representative Christine Winger currently serves on the Sexual Harassment Task Force in the House of Representatives. As a member on the Task Force, Rep. Winger has listened to hours of testimony from Illinois residents who have experienced harassment in the workplace.

The latest Task Force meetings have included testimonies from several women who experienced brutal sexual harassment while working at Ford Motor Company. In response, a House Resolution was filed this week that calls on the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Illinois Department of Human Rights, and the U.S. Department of Labor to do more.

Today in Springfield, Winger wore black, to show support for the #TimesUp movement and support the end of sexual harassment. She urged all members of the House of Representatives to support House Resolution 783, which calls for a continued investigation into the culture of sexual harassment within the United Automobile Workers labor union and asks for increased support of the women who have come forward to testify to their experiences at Ford Motor Company.

Rep. Winger was appalled at the testimonies of so many women, who have been harassed and abused in the workplace. “It is unbelievable and unacceptable that this behavior has continued to plague the workplace and affect so many women in our State,” said Winger. “Today, I stand in support of those women who so bravely told their stories so that together, we can work to make positive change and I will do everything in my power to put an end to this.”

The Representative was also encouraged to hear that Governor Rauner signed an executive order to more adequately respond to harassment claims. Through the order, the Governor would create a compliance office that will give all employees in Illinois a reliable and responsive outlet for reporting harassment.

Representative Winger believes this is another positive step forward to help put an end to sexual harassment, and effectively respond to these issues in Illinois.


With the arrival of the New Year comes a series of new laws enacted by the State of Illinois. This year, over 200 new laws will take effect on January 1. These include bills for small technical corrections as well as major pieces of legislation.

Click below for a recap of these new laws which will be on the books next year.  For more information on all the bills in the General Assembly, visit www.ilga.gov.



This week the effort to reduce the noise in the communities surrounding O’Hare Airport made significant progress with the approval of the Fly Quiet Plan. The plan calls for a greater use of the diagonal runways that run northeast and southwest, which will help alleviate jet traffic noise in the areas east and west of the airport.

Various runway configurations would be used and alternated in eight-week rotations to more fairly distribute jet noise when airplanes fly in and out of the airport. Fly Quiet gained much support from neighboring airport communities, which have experienced the most noise and would get some much needed relief under this plan.

The O’Hare Noise Compatibility Commission, which is comprised of representatives of more than 50 area municipalities and school districts, voted and passed the plan on Friday. There was strong support for the Fly Quiet plan, and the momentum of this decision will move it forward to the Chicago Department of Aviation for further approval.

The final decision before implementation would be presented to the Federal Aviation Administration.
The House of Representatives voted to override Governor Rauner’s veto of SB1351, a bill that would create the Student Loan Servicing Rights Act. This was an initiative of the Illinois Attorney General’s Office to help address the growing problem of student loan debt and the alleged abuse by student loan servicing companies.

In 2017 the Attorney General’s Office sued Navient, the largest student loan servicer in the country over allegations of abuse on student loan servicing and student loan debt collection. The Attorney General backed this legislative measure to create a student loan bill of rights, so that borrowers can have a greater understanding of the payment processing, billing statements, payment histories, and an overall more transparent process to all aspects of student loans.

This legislation also creates the position of Student Loan Ombudsman within the Office of the Attorney General, which will help provide timely assistance to student loan borrowers who are experiencing problems with loans. In addition, every student loan servicer must be licensed with IDFPR, who are charged with overseeing, investigating, examining, and disciplining servicers for any violations of the Act.

Representative Winger voted in favor of the veto override, recognizing the necessity of providing many Illinois residents and students with more understanding of their rights, responsibilities, and options when it comes to loans.

“Student loans are a heavy burden to bear, and many students after graduating college have trouble navigating their loan debt, as well as understanding the process,” said Winger. “This bill will help ensure that no student is defrauded by loan servicers. It provides a clear process so students understand their rights and know where to turn to for help along the way.”

Rep. Winger was one of 98 lawmakers supporting the measure in the House, allowing the initial veto of the bill to be successfully overridden.
During legislative veto session in the House of Representatives, a measure to amend the Unclaimed Life Insurance Benefits Act was brought forward for consideration. The bill, HB302, is an initiative of State Treasurer Michael Frerichs, to provide beneficiaries with the benefits of all insurance plans that have lapsed, and encourage insurance companies to more aggressively search for beneficiaries following the death of policy holders.

After finding that nearly $550 million was unclaimed in death benefits between 2011 and 2015, Frerichs backed this legislation to ensure money is rightfully paid to family members from life insurance policies. Under this measure, it would make it easier to claim life insurance benefits when a policyholder dies.

According to the bill, life insurance companies would be required to compare electronic records of its policies in force since 2000 with the Social Security Administration’s list of deaths to determine whether a life insurance policy should be paid. Current law only calls for companies to make payments when requested by the beneficiaries.

Representative Winger stood in support of this measure when it was presented during veto session, recognizing the need to put more pressure on life insurance companies to pay what is rightfully owed to beneficiaries.

In the House of Representatives, the veto was overridden with 71 members voting in favor of the bill. The bill will now move to the Senate for consideration, and if the motion to override receives the required votes in that Chamber, HB302 will become law.

Click the above button to view State Representative Christine Winger's 2017 Legislative Newsletter.